Slovenia’s “BTC City” Pilots Crypto Payments in Stores

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A popular shopping center situated in Slovenia has been expanding its digital currency payments test run.

Domiciled in the Slovenian capital of Ljubljana, BTC City Ljubljana is set to give a group of 150 customers the opportunity to utilize cryptocurrencies at 24 business establishments found in the huge center, which based on online advertisements, houses more than 500 storefronts. According to a report on Monday, June 11, of Slovenian TV channel “24 Ur,” stores made available for the 150 include services for clothing, electronics, and even restaurants.

Beyond the germane name given to it, the connection between the Bitcoin and the major shopping complex, touted to be the largest in Europe, does not exist. The compound first opened its doors in the 1950s before it was renamed as Blagovno Transportni Center or “BTC” Ljubljana.

The shopping complex earlier this year co-developed an initiative with startup Eligma, the company behind the payment system Elipay, which facilitates cryptocurrency transactions via mobile app.

Boasting of more than 500 stores, the shopping complex wants to be the world’s first retail center to accept payments in the form of cryptocurrencies.

The objective of launching a “Bitcoin City” in Slovenia as indicated by local news reports was supported by the country’s leadership more particularly when Prime Minister Miro Cerar and the secretary of state Tadej Slapnik paid the complex a visit earlier this month. During the visit, Slapnik treated Cerar to a cup of coffee purchased using cryptocurrency.

In an appearance at a conference last year, Cerar spoke highly of Blockchain tech. The Slovenian premier referred to the use of Blockchain technology in the public services as a goal his administration has been aspiring to achieve at the time.

During the launch of a new think tank devoted to the budding innovation, Cerar stated:

“We are also already laying the foundations for the initial pilot testing of the technology in the state administration.”